Some food for thought from our founders.

Helpful insight and advice from our clinicians, Barnaby and Kate.

Individual versus group demands.

A straightforward way of thinking about the education needs of the population of a school is through the lens of economics. For example there are 1000 pupils in the school. What is the best way to educate 1000 pupils? The obvious answer is to split them into groups of similar age and abilities and then you are able to teach a subject to…

Nothing seems to be working!?

Nothing seems to be working!? The stability of the parental couple around a child is key. I have been puzzled by a number of young people whom I have been asked to meet and who are struggling within the school structures. They seem emotionally able in many ways and yet the usual support structures are not providing containment; there does not seem to…

Outside the norm.

The school social peer group can provide a hugely unforgiving context. Between the ages of 11-14 this construct is at its peak. Young people are starting to negotiate the complex transition from their identity as a child to their identity as an adult. In primary school children are much more adult-centric in their identity. They want to get things right for their parents…

Can helping young people to recognise the value of difference enable more success in their adult life?

In popular films and media there are recognisable characteristics of social groupings portrayed in secondary schools. These are often formed around groups of young people who have similar personalities or sense of self-image. Though these tropes are highly delineated within films, they exist because there are recognisable social groupings within secondary schools. In popular culture, the classic delineations are of jocks (confident sporty…

Talk to Kate.